"Louder With Crowder" OMG Net Neutrality! (TV Episode 2017)



Steven's analogy to the postal service is the most apt in this video. Since the FCC voted to roll back Title II net neutrality regulations, they've received nearly 3 million comments in support of the current net neutrality rules. Internet Service Providers have never censored content or instituted a s0-called internet fast-lane the way these frauds explain it. So these regulations are telling ISPs not to do naughty things that they've never done in the first place.

Since most people are limited by the number of ISPs in their area, these ISPs aren't subject to typical market competition. Sites are able to manage the internet and increase performance to provide better service to compete with competition. One example of Crowder using a non sequitur is where he hypoetchically applies Title II to content providers like YouTube.

The ISPs want to hit Google, the Music stores, Amazon, Facebook and other profitable business. And these two thirds' choice” often has to be either Time Warner Cable or Comcast- two of the most abhorrent and hated companies in the United States, but successful only because of lack of competition.

Tldr: Getting rid of net neutrality allows for more competition in the market, which historically leads to lower prices for us: the consumers. YouTube isn't the user: the user who pays the ISP for a service is the user. Some Internet providers may initially fight or test the legal boundaries, but the FCC has ways of breaking defiant firms.

There are laws in place to ensure the government does not packetsniff (data collect) on people. Furthermore, since the ISP is likely your only high speed pipe to the internet, you don't have much in the way of market competition. He mentions the big argument for net neutrality is that it doesn't allow ISPs to give preference to one site or another when the two big instances of this occurring before net neutrality was shut down quickly because of the market responding to it.

There is no need for hefty government regulations on the Internet, like the 2015 Open Internet Order. On the other hand, today, for most people, if you want high speed internet, you are forced to use maybe 1 or 2 providers. If people come to a net neutrality video without knowing what a megabyte is, then it's akin to watching a video about the moon landing without knowing what the moon is. "Is it upload or download speed dude?" False dichotomy.

These people are supporting more government control to try to solve a problem of government control. -The 1996 telecom act is not when Title II net neutrality was implemented, the 1996 act is where the first internet provider rules were implemented which were later updated in 2003.

This entire video Can be debunks when people realize how their internet was pre obamas net neutrality policy. Soon the internet will be as absurdly pay-walled as Starwars Battlefront 2 was before public backlash. Net neutrality doesn't allow companies to specialize in giving you the ability to do what you want to do. Let's say there's an isp that specializes in all things gaming.

For example, a lot of small isps have said that the regulations from Net neutrality have made it harder for them to want to provide internet especially in rural Steven Crowder Net Neutrality Video and low income areas, in which Net neutrality prevented them from rolling out new services, make their networks better and viable, and raise capital.

Tldr: Getting rid of net neutrality allows for more competition in the market, which historically leads to lower prices for us: the consumers. YouTube isn't the user: the user who pays the ISP for a service is the user. Some Internet providers may initially fight or test the legal boundaries, but the FCC has ways of breaking defiant firms.

Title II (which, recall, is the basis for the catch-all) applies to all telecommunications services”—not just ISPs. Ajit and the FCC are so awesome that just the desire to repeal net neutrality rippled back in time. ISPS will always try to undercut each other in a free market.

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